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Posts Tagged ‘diabetes’

Here is a question I recently received from FOODPICKER.org:

I’ve been trying to increase my salad intake and am not sure about what type of dressing to choose.  Could you give me some suggestions for salad dressings that are acceptable for someone with diabetes?

Answer:  Increasing your salad intake is a great way to get your daily vegetables in, but also a great source of many vitamins, miners and fiber.  When creating your salad, try adding additional ingredients that will add to the flavor without relying solely on dressing such as peppers, cucumbers, eggs, mushrooms, onions etc. When you add dressing, stick to varieties that are oil and vinegar based as these are usually lower in calories and  contain a healthier type of fat called monounsaturated fat.  Avoid the creamier dressings such as ranch, blue cheese and french as these are often higher in calories and saturated fat.  Most importantly, make sure to read the label and watch your portion size.

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Here is a question I recently received from FOODPICKER.org:

I have heard I should avoid fruit juice since I have diabetes.  What about vegetable juices?  Can I have tomato juice and other vegetable juices?

Answer:  In general, fresh, frozen and dried fruits and vegetables are a better choice compared to drinking a juice beverage.  Vegetable juices do contain less carbohydrates than fruit juices, however also contain less fiber and more sodium.  Fruit juices will raise your blood sugar very quickly compared to a whole piece of fruit, and lack the fiber that whole fruit has.  Typically, a ‘choice’ or item in the list below has roughly 15 grams of carbohydrates, 0 grams of protein, 0 grams of fat and 60 calories.

  • 1/2 cup black beans
  • 1/2 cup corn, peas or potatoes
  • 1/2 cup cooked vegetables (carrots, broccoli, zucchini, cabbage)
  • 1 cup raw vegetables or salad greens
  • 1 small apple, banana or orange
  • 1/2 cup applesauce
  • 1/2 cup or 12 small cherries
  • 1/2 cup apple, orange,  tomato juice and other vegetable juices
  • 1/3 cup grape or prune juice

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Here is a question that I recently received from FOODPICKER.org:

I have type 2 diabetes and cannot tolerate milk.  What may I substitute for my recommended two milk servings per day?  Would I substitute a carbohydrate or a protein?

Answer:  What you substitute for milk depends on the reason you can not tolerate milk – is it because you are lactose intolerant, have a milk allergy or simply because you do not care for the taste?

If you are lactose intolerant, I would suggest speaking with your doctor and inquire about utilizing a lactase enzyme prior to your meals.  This would then allow you to consume dairy without having a reaction. You could also try a lactaid milk, rice or soy milk in place of regular milk.  In some instances, individuals who are lactrose intolerant can tolerate yogurt more easily due to the presence of beneficial bacteria.

If you have a milk allergy, I would suggest trying non-flavored soy or rice milk.  Flavored varities such as almond, vanilla and chocolate contain additional simple sugars which need to be accounted for in your diet.

If you simply do not care for milk to drink, I would suggest incorporating other sources of dairy in your diet such as low fat varities of cheese and yogurt which would provide your body with protein, calcium and vitamin D.

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Here is a question I recently received from FOODPICKER.org

I have recently been diagnosed with diabetes and my wife has pre-diabetes.  New Year’s Eve we always have a large celebration with cocktails and lots of food.  We are growing weary of the party this year given my new diagnosis.  Any tips on how we can still enjoy the party?

Answer:  Holiday celebrations can be a challenge, especially when there is an abundance of food and alcohol involved.  Here are some tips to how you can still enjoy the party without over indulging:

  • Mingle away from the food where you wont be as tempted to constantly graze.  Focus on catching up with old friends and not the food.
  • Remain active earlier in the day to burn additional calories that may be consumed at the celebration.
  • Eat a healthy, balanced meal/snack before the celebration – showing up hungry could lead to over eating.  If you snack, choose raw vegetables, pretzels or popcorn.  Avoid the cakes, cookies, and crackers.
  • Make sure to eat food while you drink alcohol.  Drinking alcohol without eating can  cause low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, anywhere from 6-12 hours after consumption. If you are going to drink, do so in moderation. The American Heart Association describes moderation as men drinking no more than 2 drinks/day and women 1 drink/day.   One drink equates to 12 oz beer, 4 oz wine, and 1-1.5 oz spirits.
  • Monitor your portion sizes.
  • If you over-indulge, don’t be too hard on yourself!  Ask yourself what you change next time and go back to your usual healthy way of eating.

 

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Here is a question I recently received from FOODPICKER.org

I have diabetes and this time of year is the toughest for me.  It seems holiday treats/sweets are everywhere tempting me!  Is it ok to indulge a little?  If not, how can I build up enough will power to avoid holiday sweets?

Answer:  The motto I like to follow is everything is OK in moderation. With that being said, treating yourself to a sweet once in a while is okay, you just need to plan ahead.  Here are a few suggestions:

  • Watch your portion size – typically, 3 pieces of hard candy, 1 3inch cookie, or a 1inch square cake is generally 1 carbohydrate choice
  • Plan ahead – if you are attending a gathering where you may be tempted, either eat a balanced meal ahead of time or bring a snack along
  • Save sweets for special occasions like holidays, birthdays, etc
  • Keep treats/sweets out of your house.  Avoid this aisle at the grocery store when shopping.
  • Remain hydrated.  Our bodies cant always tell the difference between hunger and thirst.
  • Continue to exercise.  Not only is this a healthy practice but will also help lower your blood sugars and balance out some treats

 

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Here is a question I recently received from FOODPICKER.org

My doctor has diagnosed me with diabetes and has told me to lose weight.  I have heard about high protein diets, low fat/high carb diets, and many others.  I want a sound diet instead of a fad.  What type of diet is best given my situation?

Answer:  It’s great that you are looking for a sound diet rather than a fad diet. Fad diets, or any other type of diet that promises quick or guaranteed results, are usually nutritionally unbalanced and unrealistic to maintain long term.  Rather than following one of these fad diets, make changes to your current diet to incorporate a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean meats, low fat dairy products and healthier fats.  Including these items in your diet will allow you to maintain the diet changes, lose weight at an appropriate rate, and keep the weight off.

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Here is a question I recently received from FOODPICKER.org

I have type 2 diabetes and love Mexican food.  Could you give me some tips on what to order at my favorite Mexican restaurant?

Answer:  When dining out,  it is important to pay attention to portion sizes and cooking methods, and also ask how items are prepared.  Here are some suggestions:

  • Choose items that are grilled instead of fried
  • Split your entrée with a friend or ask for a to-go box to pre-portion what you will eat
  • Substitute the rice or fries with an order or black beans to increase the fiber content
  • Order water or a diet soda to drink instead of  regular soda
  • Watch the size and amount of tortillas you eat – 1 6in tortilla contains 15g carbohydrate or is 1 carbohydrate choice
  • Now days, most restaurants have an online website and post nutrient information.  Take some time and explore these websites so you are aware of just how many calories and fat are in these products

 

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